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20121222
20121230
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CSPAN2 28
CSPAN 24
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CNNW 14
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KQED (PBS) 6
LINKTV 6
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English 145
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 145 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00am EST
a civil-rights commission to put the facts on the table and i am told by someone at the meeting he slammed the table and they will put the facts on the table. policy is sometimes said up because there is a tough problem is that the report then they go away but in the future would depend on what it found out and how aggressive it was in the public thought about it. >>host: initially it was set up as a temporary commission? >>guest: right. the right age one year before the overall crisis. it was too diffuse part of the crisis to present a better image of the country to the world. if on the way they could recommend solutions, that would be great. >>host: who was the first commission? >>guest: to put people on there who would be respected. from the white man he was president from university of mish station michigan. the secretary of labor thought he was a moderate i read all of the white house files i did not just serve on the commission i got all the files and we had all of it so we could see inside though one lone black guy in the eisenhower white house the listlessly to have names to a poin
SFGTV2
Dec 25, 2012 9:00pm PST
and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're grailsd with th
LINKTV
Dec 24, 2012 8:00am PST
american president had made in modern times on the whole question of civil rights and voting rights. he condemned the violence over and over again, and near the end of the speech he said, "and we shall overcome. we shall overcome." we call it the "we shall overcome" speech. i was sitting next to dr. martin luther king jr. as we listened to president johnson. i looked at dr. king. tears came down his face. he started crying. and we all cried a little when we heard the president saying, "we shall overcome." and dr. king said, "we will make it from selma to montgomery, and the voting rights act will be passed." two weeks later, more than 10,000 of us, people from all over america, started walking from selma to montgomery. and by the time we made it to montgomery five days later, there were almost 30,000 black and white citizens-protestant, catholic, jewish, men, women, young people. it was like a holy march. and the congress debated the act, passed it, and on august 6, 1965, president lyndon johnson signed it into law. amy goodman: congressmember john lewis. we continue our conversation af
LINKTV
Dec 24, 2012 3:00pm PST
by a leader of the civil rights movement who risked his life numerous times marching for the right of all americans to vote: 13-term democratic congressmember john lewis of georgia. he was a leader of the civil rights movement who marched side by side with dr. martin luther king. he served as chair of the student nonviolent coordinating committee, helped organize the freedom rides and spoke at the 1963 march on washington. he has been arrested more than 40 times and has just written a new book called across that vision for change. he visited us in our studio, and i asked congressmember lewis about the voter purge in florida, where the justice department had sued to block republican governor rick scott's controversial effort to remove thousands of registered voters from the rolls, using an outdated drivers' license database to ostensibly identify non-citizens registered to vote. rep. john lewis: it is unreal, it is unbelievable, that at this time in our history, 47 years after the voting rights act was passed and signed into law, that we're trying to go backward. i think there is a systema
SFGTV2
Dec 25, 2012 9:30pm PST
secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introduction -- no, i get to say something. i get to say something. as everyone in
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 4:15pm EST
in with no preparation at all, when president kennedy's legislative program, civil rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they had been controlling it for a quarter of the century, to see him get the program up and running, ramming it through to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination is a lesson in what a president can do if he now knows all of the levers to pull, but has the will, lyndon johnson's case, almost vicious drive to do it to win, to say over and over again as i am always saying to myself when i am doing the research, look what he is doing here. i don't say i succeeded but i try to explain that in my books and to me, to see him do that is something that is not only fascinating but revelatory, giving a true insight into how power works in washington and there's another reason that i don't get tired of doing these books of lyndon johnson. you are always learning something new and that goes even if what you are researching is something that has been written about 1,0
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 8:00pm EST
that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 19641965. he opposed martial -- in 1964 and 1965. he oppose richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time. he got lucky. issues that result on civil rights -- you got resolved on civil rights. senator byrd that's on the leadership ladder and he rises -- gets on the leadership ladder and he rises. he becomes the with in a stealth campaign. -- whip in a stealth campaign. the idea of robert byrd as leader goes from being inconceivable to virtually inevitable. he has earned his way up to be leader. at the beginning of my book, he becomes leader and replaces mike mansfield, who is sort of an icon. can replaces byrd mike mansfield. but the truth is, no one thought that mike mansfield could replace lyndon johnson. that is certain the way things work. as my book starts, the first chapter is about byrd. it is entitled "the grind." he is a hard-working
MSNBC
Dec 27, 2012 3:00pm PST
, not armed fortresses. >> why is the civil rights community up in arms about this? and is this just now that we're starting to see some of us in the civil rights community become concerned about assault weapons? >> well, absolutely not, reverended. national action network and other civil rights organizations have been engaged in this work to deem wial with the deregulatf gun laws. we have engaged in occupy the corners. we were out on corners all across the city. >> yeah, you would be on all night every weekend. >> absolutely. trying to stand in the kwa of violence on friday, saturday and sunday nights. we also are engaged in a task force against gun violence in new york city right now where we've allotted $5 million to go towards gun violence prevention. in atlanta, they had to shake off the violence campaign where they're working in schools. reverend charles williams has been working on this issue. we have been engaged for many years in dealing with this. >> let me ask you this. you come as the executive director for us with a personal commitment because in our communities of minoritie
LINKTV
Dec 28, 2012 8:00am PST
carolina governor is being urged to pardon a group of civil rights activists were falsely convicted and imprisoned 40 years ago for the firebombing of a white owned grocery store. the conviction wic overturned in 1980, but the state has never pardon them. we will speak with one of the wilmington 10 who served eight years behind bars and it became head of the naacp. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. president obama is set to meet with congressional leaders at the white house just three days before a year in deadline to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. some $600 billion in automatic spending cuts and tax increases will take effect if no agreement is reached. obama and the rest of republicans remain of the impasse over the republican refusal to allow tax hikes even for the wealthiest americans. senate majority leader on thursday accused house speaker john boehner of holding up a deal. >> the american people i don't think understand the house representative is operating without the house of representat
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 6:00am EST
1981 to 1982 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals and in the district of columbia circuit in 1990. president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 23, 1991. ladies and gentlemen please welcome justice thomas and professor amar to the stage. [applause] [applause] >> the thank you ladies and gentlemen for that extraordinarily gracious ,-com,-com ma warm welcome. thank you to the national archives and to the staff for making this event possible and thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitution accountability center and thank you justice thomas for being with us today as we marked the 225th earth day, 225th anniversary of our constitution. i guess i would like to start our conversation with the words of the constitution, we the people, and what that phrase means to you and how that phrase baby has changed over time thanks to amendments a
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:00am EST
records, 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today as one of the last of the jim crow demagogues. and he was. he was that. he was one of the last jim crow demagogue. what we forget about thurmond is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what do i mean by that? what's a sun belt conservative? the sun belt, it's one of the big stories, one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. and that is the flow of jobs, of industry, of resources and population from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and the southwest in the post-world war ii period. the southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 1:00pm EST
time in the most dramatic, possible way. we hear the confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life and death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy on the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office. that this tonight as we continue through the holiday on c-span2. >> the west virginia state society honored senator robert byrd last month. the longest living senator in history, robert died in -- robert byrd died in 2010. we will hear from two of his staffers. >> the first speaker is ira shapiro. author of "the last great senate." he played important roles in foreign intelligence surveillance and the completing of the metrorail system. during the clinton administration, he served as a leading u.s. trader and earned the rank of staffman. -- ambassador. he was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the s
SFGTV
Dec 26, 2012 2:30pm PST
and thank you even for being your civil rights attorney and you are still representing people in need and i appreciate that. i know angela represents again the kind of contributions the italian community has made to our great city and continues to make and i am here to tonight to wish you a great year of italian culture but to kick start it. it was really just a few months ago that the ambassador ofity italy came through and talk about this wonderful thing they were to do to celebrate year of italian culture but transfer that to our country of the united states so i know they're going to start those events in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have come here to sa
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 8:00pm EST
are not hatch in three days. it would take three long weeks for those eggs to hatch. the civil rights movement taught me patience. never give up, never to give in, to never give up, but to always keep your eyes on the prize. so across the bridge is about patients, about how, truth, love and reconciliation. now when i was growing up in rural alabama and was visiting a town of troy, visiting montgomery, visited tuskegee and later as a student in nashville, tennessee and made a living in atlanta. i saw the sign said white men, colored women, colored rating, white waiting. as a child my mother, father, grandparents said that's the way it is. don't get in the way, don't get in trouble. but in 1855 at the age of 15, i heard of rosa parks. i heard of martin luther king junior. in 1957 at the age of 17 i never said parks. the next year at the age of 18, i meant to her martin luther king junior. the action of rosa parks, people in my camera and leadership of dr. king inspired me to get in the way, to get in trouble. for more than 50 years have been getting in trouble, good chabot, necessary travel. [ap
PBS
Dec 23, 2012 6:00pm PST
had someone attached himself to the civil-rights for those confined in mental institutions. so our rights were being abridged and suld be released. in many places there were no accommodations made. >> that part was fulfilled. it was talked about but never fulfilled. i am going to go back to the point that nobody likes, this nexus between mental health and guns is something i'm not ready to make unless we go all the way and suggest that some of these individuals we have incarcerated in jail who killed one or two people, that they are mentally ill as well. they do not count. it is only the kid -- >> we have irrational killers. al capone. they were courting in on his territory so he was shot. that is not mental illness. but if you think like a german loughner, where you live in a world of numerology and forces -- he was talking about the influence of grammar that the government was using over him. you are talking about people living in a different world and they are not responsible. i believe in the insanity defense and acquittal on the grounds of insanity. >> daniel patrick moynihan,
PBS
Dec 23, 2012 6:30pm PST
as an engine for change, at the moment of the civil rights -- african american civil rights movement culminating in the voting rights act, civil rights act, the beginning of the great society. and then the left said, "you know what? democracy doesn't work. let's take to the streets." well, always take to the streets, but always make sure that there are people in the halls of power who can listen to what you're saying on the streets and say, "okay, i get it. i'm going to do something about this." which means surrendering to some degree the romance of revolution. i hope that i'm not less radical in terms of what i'd like to see transformed. i believe that we can live in a more economically and socially just world than we live in. i think we have to save the planet and i think that's going to call for enormous sacrifice and a transformation of society where we really come to terms with what has to happen in order to stop global warming or reverse it. >> and can that happen without a mass movement? what lincoln did he did because before him and behind him were the abolitionists, the radi
CNN
Dec 23, 2012 8:00am PST
if politicians are going to talk about civil rights, we're not going to make it a front burner issue. journalists say if politicians don't talk about gay marriage, we're not going to cover it. your seeding responsibility to a political class that wants to duck uncomfortable issues and not to be advocates and don't they have a responsibility to say we just saw 20 children killed -- >> we covered civil rights and the gay rights because it was in the streets. we covered it because it was a legitimate news story. this is a legitimate news story. we can't go on "today" show or cnn in the morning week after week covering the story that is only being talked about on sets like this. >> there was a mall shooting. there was a mall shooting two days or a week before this where two people were killed. that was it. >> two policemen killed in topeka, kansas, two policemen killed in topeka, kansas, the same day. do we now point our cameras at those incidents more? do we ask questions of the president -- >> cover the news. >> you know what, fred, the news is also not just a spectacular horrifying incident when t
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 6:00pm EST
? where did it come from? >> guest: probably having parents that were civil rights activists in the '60s in the bay area. that was probably my initial interest. i saw their activism, and that was important. but also, i think i became interested in international affairs at spelman, in particular for s--from some courses that i took, and then harvard was a wonderful place to study international relations. the end of the cold war story became important to me later on in my graduate career when i took a job, to the dismay of my dissertation adviser, to do the research for george shultz's memoir and--out at stanford. c-span: why--why to the dismay? >> guest: oh, because it was such a huge project for some--someone who was working on her own dissertation, to take on another project, and--but i thought it was a great opportunity. c-span: how did that happen? >> guest: in 1989, i moved out to california to work with condi rice, who was my outside reader on my thesis committee, partly, and also to be in the bay area, and she got a job in the bush at the first bush administration, and so i just ha
PBS
Dec 28, 2012 8:00pm PST
that we see in -- acrimony. it took us a long time to do the right thing in civil rights legislation. but we are seeing the perfection if i could use that term of the ways in which the two pears have become polarized in ways that overlap ideology, region and partisan and so the walls are getting thicker and thicker. and buzz of that it trickles down to the state level. and the gerrymandering that we see that reinforces the strength of people in particular pockets in the country means that most members now fear a primary challenge more than they fear a general election challenge and that gives all the incentives for ideolo gs to push -- gwen: is it fair to say that either side is being more intrasigent? >> yes, because they're a more ideological party. the block of conservatives is more than the block of liberals. the competition within the republican party has a higher of purity than democrats do. 60% of the votes that mitt romney got in 2012 were from people who call themselves conservatives. only 42% of the votes the president got where from people who call themselves liberal. a mo
NBC
Dec 28, 2012 11:00pm EST
dispute. an abrupt end to the career of one long term maryland civil- rights leader. carl snowden will retire january 8. the office of the announcement earlier today. the decision comes amid legal problems. he was convicted last month of marijuana possession and has a court date for violating his probation in a drunk driving case. tonight was a reversal of fortune for morgan state university's president. the board of regents voted to renew his contract, weeks after voting not to. >> president wilson was diplomatic when i inquired about what led up to this controversy and why it suddenly ended in his favor, instead of pointing the finger at his critics, he took the high road. surely after the vote, dr. david wilson told us he is honored more as the university's board of regents minya their confidence in him and by extending his contract to june 2014. the decision comes a few weeks after the board decided to oust him as the president. >> a situation he blames himself for. >> the bucket stopped in the president's office. whatever transpired here, i will be the first one to raise my h
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 9:15am EST
him. not moving him around from point to point as we were advised by john door, my iconic civil rights hero and nicholas katzenbach. he was to have as much freedom as any other student. well, yes. but at the same time, there are deer hunters, and it was the season, and we had cop instant, we were constantly aware who might come up on to the campus, didn't look like a student, had a bent mind and a deer rifle, and we had to be constantly aware of that kind of threat to his life. he was a brave person. i was sitting in his dormitory room the first couple days reading the hate mail, the death threats. very accurate, very detailed. james, we know where you live, we know where your participants are -- parents are, we're going to kill you and we're going to kill your twins. he looked at me and said, lieu tempt, i'm late for my spanish class. let's go. that kind of courage stayed with him throughout my association with him. he never cracked, he never blinked. the students blinked. i should say that 99% of the student body went about their way getting an education. they cared little about him
MSNBC
Dec 28, 2012 3:00pm PST
to understand what is at stake and who stood where. it's an old civil rights song. what side are you on. if it comes to that, that's exactly what the american people need to say, not to democrats, not to republicans, but to american people. that's who's going to be impacted by this. when you don't give your un employment check, when your payroll tax goes up, when your paycheck is not what it was, that's going to be to the american people. we will then have the bipartisanship because everybody is going to suffer together. >> you better believe it. >> and the republicans keep saying they're worried for the 2014 vote. well, let's get a vote and think of what's going to happen in 2014. >> dr. james peterson and maria theresa, thanks for your time tonight. both of you have a happy new year: >> thanks, reverend. happy new year to you, too. >> whoever said the republicans haven't accomplished anything, they are finishing something in first place today. >> "politics nation" has voted and we have the top political picture of the year. it's a good one. that's next. [ laughter ] smoke? nah, i'm go
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 1:00am EST
know, having protests from southerners who were unhappy about the civil rights. we had people who were unhappy about the war. i told chuck, i said, you to the easy way out. [laughter] you went to vietnam in 1968. when you think, all of you -- just think what happened in 1968, if you are born and then, it was a year from hell. i mean, we had the north koreans captured one of our ships. we had washington burning. you know, it was just awful. but lucinda robb was born. so that was something good about the year. >> susan, on a different scale, your father has been vindicated by history for pardoning richard nixon, but at the time there was a lot of popular blowback. overnight, his approval ratings fell from i think the 70% to below 50% certainly. what was your perspective from that time about -- did you encounter people who would mention their displeasure at that point to you? >> i did. even though i was on the third floor, my room was on the same side of the white house as hers was, and i heard the demonstrators, too. you cannot believe how thick the windows are at the white house but you
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 6:30pm EST
time in the most dramatic possible way. we hear the tense confrontations of the civil rights movements and the life or death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy joined in on a discussion on the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office. tuesday evening at 7:00 p.m. eastern on c-span2. >> there were a number of attributes and memorial services last week for senator daniel inouye of hawaii. his remains have laid in state in d.c., and in the state capital of allied. next, from the rotunda, john boehner, vice-president biden, and others. >> let us pray. gracious god, sovereign lord of history, thank you for the exemplary impact of senator daniel ken inouye on our national history. lord, we are grateful for the excellence that distinguished his significant career, for the quiet grace and dignity with which he represented the aloha state, and for the gift of discernment that enabled him to serve you faithfully for the good of america. as we express gratitude for the laudable footprints he left in the sands of time, give us your power to pe
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 11:00pm EST
a program called, who is the dean of the civil rights movement, dean of black leadership, who at the whole idea about the march on washington almost 50 years ago would say from time to time, maybe our foremothers and forefathers thought came to this great land in different shapes. but we all in the same boat now. so it doesn't matter whether we are black or white, latino, asian american or native american. it doesn't matter whether a democrat or republicans. it doesn't matter whether we are straight. it does another whether jewish or not psalm, christians, we are one people. we are one family. we are one house spirit that's what the struggle been about. [applause] this book, "across that bridge" is saying in effect they struggle is a struggle to retain the soul of america. it's not a struggled the last one day, one week, one month, one year for one lifetime. maybe we take more than one lifetime to create a more perfect union. to create the beloved community. the community at peace with itself. now you heard david tell you that i did get arrested a few times. and young people coming out chi
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 1:00am EST
, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was standing on the edge of the hotel ballroom taking and one of life's great moments. the marriage of the daughter is so deeply emotional. george the loving father was clearly caught up in a moment. that was the moment i seized the opportunity to strike. i sidled up to him and whispered ever so softly in his ear,
NBC
Dec 29, 2012 5:00am EST
, director of civil rights for the maryland attorney general's office, will retire on january 8th. the ag's office made that announcement friday. this decision comes amid some legal problems for snoweden. he was convicted last month of marijuana possession and has a court date last night. >>> one minute he's out, the next he's back in. the roller coaster ride for morgan state university's president david wilson appears to be over. yesterday the board voted to renew his contract. george lettuce has more. >> david wilson told us he is honored morgan state board of regents renewed his confidence by extending his contract to june 2014. friday's decision comes just a few weeks after the board voted to oust him as president, a situation he blames himself for. >> i'm the president of the institution. and so, as president, the buck stops in the president's office. and so certainly whatever transpired here, i'll be the first one to raise my hand to say i own it. >> he promises to improve relations and communication between his office and board members. >> i'll make sure the board is involved and t
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 6:00pm EST
of the campaign civil rights division. in that capacity, leading a campaign, he convinced kennedy to telephone caruthers scott king in the matter of his imprisonment on the trumped up charges. it was a risky move given the residual racism that still tainted american life. but many analysts had concluded that the phone call attracted enough african-american votes to the democratic party that your to win a razor-thin victory to john kennedy. after the inauguration, president kennedy asked shriver to assume leadership as the founding director of the peace corps. when asked why he had selected his brother in law for the job, kennedy said that if the project were to become a flop, it would be easier to fire a member of the family when a political ally. when we look at the origins of the peace corps today we have to be careful not to read history backwards or to argue that the success of the peace corps was inevitable. it wasn't so in 1961. deep in the cold war, many thoughtful people were skeptical putting their reputation and presence of the united states in underdeveloped countries into the hands
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 6:00am EST
own country, lawyers and people have experienced a lot of pain in the civil rights movement. what would be a way to avoid these calamitous events and bring about the rule of law? >> we will not fire you. they might be willing to do that. if they did that, the judges would love it. nobody else would like it. but maybe they would do it. we have an administrative law rule. let's have all of the court proceedings on television. the proceedings. not the deliberations. let's not get into that. let's have the trials and all those things. maybe they would do that. what about the arbitration system? for revolving business situations --you are now paying them so much and you are not firing them. why don't we do it according to prepublished rules? there are so many things. you do not have to do everything at once. i saw brook sheer andshe sent us a film from china, which we looked at. it was a school, fifth graders. the fifth graders had suggested to the government -- they did a film than is absolutely priceless. the parents -- they did not know how to do it. they would make this mistake or
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00pm EST
making yourself t subject to liability under thetl 1964e call or under the civil-rights law of 1964. so, under certain circumstancess you can would make yourself -- which subjects yourself to legal liability, or another way. if you commit violence and in the indication of a -- the commission of a violent act refer to people using the n-word, you might be subject to hate law legislation, and thereby not only be prosecuted for assault or whatever violent act you have committed, but you might subject yourself to an enhanced penalty by running afoul of state hate laws. so, under certain circumstances, yeah, you would be in violation of the law. generally speaking, though, because of the strong shielding power of the first amendment, people, for instance, comedians or writers, can use the n-word and not have to fear the law, though you might have to fear a public opinion which itself can be a very powerful force. >> host: is that the near word versus citing word? >> host: the law of homicide, all sorts of different levels of homicide, and one big divide is between manslaughter and second deg
FOX Business
Dec 26, 2012 7:00pm EST
and participation.s. lou: when you talk about the five states, those are states because of civil rights transgressions 60 years ago, 50 years ago, they still remain under the watchful eye of the justice department for a revision in their electoral laws or procedures, right?pro >> absolutely. states have asked the federal government permission before they can implement a law thathe affects elections, but in a state passing a law, that she, went up in a state of georgia, up over 40% 2004 to 2008. there is not one court case with any state law they have alleged voter suppression or shanda has been voter suppression.h so it is unfounded. lou: absolutely unfounded, the state of michigan,he any state diplomatic of labor in this country, has to be the state of michigan moving in that direction, they you will, ofng south carolina and 23 i other states. this is starting to look like a serious shift historically in this country toward entire nation becoming a right to workk >> usc nine right-to-work statee gaining nine congressional seats from nine states. this is due mostly to the business clima
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